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Archive Of Apple Computer Related Ephemera From The Collection Of Kenneth Silverman, Apple Computers
1 Apple Computers Archive Of Apple Computer Related Ephemera From The Collection Of Kenneth Silverman
Hardcover Fine 
The history of computers is generally considered to begin in the early part of the 20th century -with the advent of room-filling machines filled with easily broken vacuum tubes, germanium diodes, punch cards and rooms that were cooled to near freezing so that fires wouldn't break out. Many generations of large machines followed… all of them able to do few different tasks, and even if they could switch between basic mathematics to logarithms, the innards of the machines had to be stopped and manually adjusted. Moore's Law (the observation that, over the history of computing hardware, the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit has doubled approximately every two years. ) proved true and computers became faster, more complex and more able to do multiple tasks. It wasn't, however, until the early to mid-1970's that anyone even considered taking mainframe computers into miniaturization for personal use; the idea that it could be done came from the fact that radio transistors were growing ever smaller and the small scale integrated circuit was introduced. (This explanation is exceedingly simplified - there's a whole lot more between points A and B than this). One of the early (relatively speaking) models of a "personal" computer (that term hadn't really come into full use in the 70's) was the Altair 8800 - which was purchased as a kit and you, the customer, got the exciting task of building it yourself. Out of that era of geeks and nerds wielding soldering guns and building their own circuit boards came a group known as the Homebrew Computer Club. The HCC got together regularly to help each other build computers, talk about computers, work on additions to or modifications of the Altair 8800's they had bought, or work out ideas on how to make these systems more useful and interesting (including writing software to connect to peripherals, create games and trade tapes of games they had gotten elsewhere). One of the members of the HCC was Steve Wozniak - today known by the eponym "Woz" - who built a computer in his garage on a single board in 1976. Woz not only created the guts of the machine (designing and soldering all the circuits himself) , but generated the BASIC software code to interface between the user and the machine. That machine was called the APPLE I. (Yes, the truth is, Woz was the actual creator of the Apple I - Steve Jobs watched him build it and had the idea to market it, but he had no involvement with the actual design. ) Approximately 200 copies of the Apple I were built and sold. During this time, Steve Jobs decided that he and Woz could turn building computers into a real business and it's at that point that the real Apple Computers, the company, came about. The impact that Apple Computers has had on the world of technology, especially in the early days on personal computers and their multitude of uses, is not hard to see. Nowadays, with iPhones, iPads, Apple Watches, Apple TV and so much more, the company name is synonymous with cutting edge technology and stuff that makes the world easier to navigate. Back in 1977, the two Steves didn't know exactly how great their Company would become - they just wanted to help other nerds have access to their own computing ability. But Apple Computers would become one of the three to four companies that would create machines that would make personal computing accessible to the mainstream non-geek user. One thing that Apple Computers did well from the start was to have marketing gimmicks and tchotchkes available for workers and customers alike. Kenneth Silverman, an Engineer in Silicon Valley during this time, was also a member of the Homebrew Computer Club. Ken became familiar with Woz through the HCC and became an ardent Apple computer user. He owned an Apple II very early on and in 1978 was one of the ten founding members of the SF Apple CORE - people who got together to talk about their Apple computers, share programs, create new programs Ken in the SF Apple Core wrote some of the first software to connect a peripheral printer to an Apple II and teach others about programming, using and enjoying Apple computers. At some point in the CORE's early years, Ken became the editor for the Apple CORE newsletter, called the Cider Press. He also helped found the International Apple Core. Ken has another connection to Apple Computers as well - because he was so much part of the CORE and had contact with Woz and other Apple Computer employees, he put together his own company called International Datawares, Inc. Which did work for Apple and created give-away items for the company - especially pins and other small promotional items. In other words, he was (and still is) in a position to have access to a unique collection of items relating to the history of the company. This archive consists of group of items related to Apple Computers and advertising for the same, including: 1.) One pair of Apple Glasses in custom case (1984) : Limited to 30 pairs, Apple Glasses were commissioned by Steve Wozniak and custom made by a local artisan. Woz kept several pairs for himself and gave the rest out to friends over the years. Many of the pairs have been damaged due to the fragile nature of these glasses and they have come up for auction only two times in the last 15 years. These glasses are the epitome of (excuse the pun) the face of Apple Computers. Glasses are in Fine condition as is the case. 2.) Hell Froze Over Poster (framed) (2005) : 36"x24". : This poster ironically notes the point in Apple computer history when the company finally deviated from their mandate of not working on a Windows based platform - in order to make their new product iTunes available to a larger clientele. The poster is in Fine condition, as is the frame. 3.) Mission Impossible Poster (framed) (1996) : 20"x14". : approximately: Apple Computers made a very lucrative product placement contract with the producers of the first Mission Impossible Movie featuring Tom Cruise. The company then offered posters in several sizes as cross advertising. The poster is in Fine condition as is the frame. 4.) SIGNED Apple Lore Poster (framed) (2003) : 17"x 11". : The Computer Museum in San Jose, CA created this poster to commemorate an Apple Computers event on September 13, 2003. The poster shows a series of lapel pins created over the years (some of which were designed by Ken Silverman). This poster has been signed by Woz. The poster and frame are in fine condition. 5.) Apple Belt Buckle (large, multi-colored) (undated) : One of Five made. 2 ½" in diameter with large leather belt. Buckle and Belt in fine condition. 6.) Apple Belt Buckle (small, gold colored with silver attachment) (undated) : 2"x 1 1/3" rectangular, with thin leather belt. Buckle in very good+ condition - there is some scratching to the face of the buckle. Unknown quantity. 7.) Box of lapel pins, earrings, tie tacks, necklace, et al (various dates) : 23 individual items, many of which were designed and produced by Ken Sterling. Quantities range from one of two (cuff links) to one of 10,000. (Small, multicolored apple earrings limited to 25, smallish, multicolored apple necklace one of 100, MacIntosh Key Ring one of approx. 50, Apple III cuff-links one of two, Apple stickpin one of 50, Macintosh Stickpin one of 50, Lisa stickpin one of 50, Lisa lapel pin one of 100 along with several other items that were made in larger numbers). All items are in fine condition and held in Lucite boxes within a hinged display box. 8.) Newton Carrying bag (fabric) (c 1993-1998) : Black fabric zippered pouch / carry case for the Newton -Apple's first digital "Assistant" which featured handwriting recognition. The bag is in fine condition. 9.) SIGNED 8" x 10" color photograph of Woz (undated) : Promotional photograph of Woz, signed by him on the face. Matted photo (unframed) is in Very Good++ condition. 10.) International Apple Core pin (c1979) : Ken Silverman, one of the original 10 members of the SF Apple Core Group, helped create an international group of Apple users in 1979. As the SF Apple Core had lapel pins for members, Ken continued the tradition by having lapel pins available for International Apple Core members. Quantity unknown, but probably in the thousands or more. The lapel pin and container are in Fine condition. (this pin is in the display container with the other pins, but is unboxed. Fine condition. 11.) Large Apple tie tack in Lucite container (undated, but early) : approx. 3/4th" diameter. Fine condition. 12.) Woz: The Prodigal Son of Silicon Valley, Doug Garr, author (1984) : 1st edition. Mass market paperback book in Very Good- condition. This is an early biography of Steve Wozniak, featuring a photograph of him wearing his Apple Glasses as the cover art. 13.) UK iPhone pin in promotional cardboard (undated) : produced specifically for the UK unveiling of the iPhone - only available at the grand opening in London. Unknown number available. As new, in wrapper. 14.) UK iPad pin in promotional cardboard (undated) : produced specifically for the UK unveiling of the iPad - only available at the grand opening in London. Unknown number available. As new, in wrapper. 15.) Macintosh Plus Wooden floppy disc holder (c1986) : 8 ¼" x 8 ¼" x 4 ½" wooden (oak? ) box with particle board dividers inset, with gilt silk screened lettering and apple logo on top edge. 16.) Applelink wine glasses (pair of two - clear glass) (c1986) : This pair of glasses comes from the California (Ken doesn't remember where) launch party for the AppleLink system. From Wikipedia: "AppleLink was the name of both Apple Computer's online service for its dealers, third party developers, and users, and the client software used to access it. Prior to the commercialization of the Internet, AppleLink was a popular service for Mac and Apple IIGS users. The service was offered from about 1986 to 1994 to various groups, before being superseded by their short-lived eWorld and finally today's multiple Apple websites. " There was an unknown quantity of these fluted wine glasses produced, with the AppleLink logo etched on the sides. Both glasses are in fine condition. 17.) Apple Tee-shirt in original tube from an opening of an Apple store at the Valley Fair Shopping Center (either San Jose or Roseville, CA) opening. (Undated, but within the last 10 years or so) : Still in original tee-shirt tube. As new. 18.) SIGNED Revolution in the Valley by Andy Hertzfeld. 2005, O'Reilly Media, Inc. (oblong Book with dust jacket) : Signed and inscribed by author and co-creator of the Macintosh, Any Herzfeld. Both book and dust jacket are in Fine condition. Named Co-creator, Andy Herzfeld had a very important influence on the entire look and programming of the revolutionary Macintosh computer system. 19.) International Apple Core Presents Apple Orchard: Volume 2 number 1, Spring 1981: Single issue of the International Apple Core magazine edited by Ken Silverman. The magazine is in Very Good condition and was issued without a dust jacket. There is a coffee circle to the front cover of the magazine, along with some light rippling from climate changes. 20.) Apple Tee-shirt in rectangular cardboard box from an opening of an Apple store at either the Galleria Roseville (? ) (CA) opening. (Undated, but within the last 10 years or so) : Still in original packaging, with a silver sticker featuring an apple which is keeping the container unopened. As new in box. 21.) Facsimile copy of the Best of Cider Press 1978-1979 edited by Ken Silverman, second Printing, August 1980. : Copied by the Computer History Museum in San Jose for Ken Silverman (and not easily obtained either! ) , this compilation of the best articles, program codes, etc. Was published by Ken Silverman for the SF Apple Core in 1980 in an unknown, but very small number and is extremely difficult to find now. This facsimile, in folder, is in as new condition thus. 22.) Inside Macintosh: Volumes I, II and II. 1987, Apple Computers, Inc. Sixth printing: Very Good+ to Near Fine- with a Fine dust jacket. The book was compiled by Apple Computers to help both Apple employees and Apple dealers / customers in writing programs / altering programs for the Macintosh - better known as the development documentation manuals. 23.) Inside Macintosh: Volume IV (includes Macintosh Plus and Macintosh 512K enhanced computer material). 1987. Apple Computers, Third Printing: An oversized paperback book issued without a dust jacket. The book is in Fine condition. As with the previous listing, this book contains development documentation material for third party users / developers. (for more photos of items, please email) 
Price: 7500.00 USD
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A typed, signed letter on personal letterhead regarding his book Splendid Poseur: Joaquin Miller American Poet, [Ephemera] [Typed, signed letter] [Joaquin Miller] [Juanita Miller] [Californiana]
2 [Ephemera] [Typed, signed letter] [Joaquin Miller] [Juanita Miller] [Californiana] A typed, signed letter on personal letterhead regarding his book Splendid Poseur: Joaquin Miller American Poet
1954 Ephemera Near Fine 
This letter is typed on both the recto and verso by the author M. M. Marberry - it's a letter of thanks for some tidbits of information regarding the recipient's time in the Navy, and goes on to mention how his book Splendid Poseur has been received by his daughter, Juanita (she threatened to sue over "distortions") , and then goes on to ask if the receiver had read one of the author's other books. Included is a laid-in newspaper review of the book Comstock Commotion by Lucieus Beebe which had been reviewed by the author (M. M. Marberry). 
Price: 35.00 USD
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