Agriculture

Agriculture

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Agriculture For Schools Of The Pacific Slope, Hilgard, E. W. (Eugene Woldemar) and W. J. V. Osterhout
1 Hilgard, E. W. (Eugene Woldemar) and W. J. V. Osterhout Agriculture For Schools Of The Pacific Slope
New York MacMillan Company 1916 8th Printing Hardcover Very Good 
B&W Illustrations; This book is in Very Good condition and is lacking a dust jacket. The spine ends, corners and edges of the book covers have some rubbing, bumping and small spots of fraying. The covers have noticeable rubbing and there is a small tear to the cloth on the rear cover from being rubbed. The text pages are clean and bright. The front endpaper includes a previous owner's inked name, and the blank page following the end of the text, and before advertisements has been used to write several notes in pencil. "Eugene Woldemar Hilgard (January 5, 1833, Zweibrücken, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany – January 8, 1916, Berkeley, California, United States) was a German-American expert on pedology (the study of soil resources). An authority on climate as a soil forming factor, soil chemistry and reclamation of alkali soils, he is considered the father of modern soil science in the United States." 
Price: 25.00 USD
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Know The Soil You Build On  (Information Bulletin 320), U. S. Department Of Agriculture (A. A. Klingebiel)
2 U. S. Department Of Agriculture (A. A. Klingebiel) Know The Soil You Build On (Information Bulletin 320)
Washington D. C. U. S. Department of Agriculture 1967 1st Edition; 1st Printing Stapled wraps Near Fine 
B&W Illustrations; This is a larger than trade sized booklet with illustrated covers and a stapled spine. The booklet is in Near Fine condition and was issued without a dust jacket. The text pages are clean and bright. This booklet helps homebuyers learn to check the type of soil before putting foundations down. "For soil resources, experience has shown that a natural system approach to classification, i. E. Grouping soils by their intrinsic property (soil morphology) , behaviour, or genesis, results in classes that can be interpreted for many diverse uses. Differing concepts of pedogenesis, and differences in the significance of morphological features to various land uses can affect the classification approach. Despite these differences, in a well-constructed system, classification criteria group similar concepts so that interpretations do not vary widely. This is in contrast to a technical system approach to soil classification, where soils are grouped according to their fitness for a specific use and their edaphic characteristics." 
Price: 10.00 USD
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