Speeches

Speeches

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The Entrancing Life Address Delivered on Installation As Chancellor of Edinburgh University October 25, 1930, Barrie, J. M. (James Matthew)
1 Barrie, J. M. (James Matthew) The Entrancing Life Address Delivered on Installation As Chancellor of Edinburgh University October 25, 1930
New York Charles Scribner's Sons 1930 1st American Edition; 1st Printing Hardcover Very Good+ 
This is a small format book. The book is in Very Good+ condition and was possibly issued without a dust jacket. The book includes the Scribner Logo and letter A on the copyright page. The off-white covers have noticeable toning and ground-in dirt. The text pages are clean and bright. "At the age of 22 Barrie enrolled at the University of Edinburgh during which time he wrote theatrical reviews for the Edinburgh Evening Courant. After graduating in 1882, he moved to London to work as a journalist and pursue his literary ambitions. He published his first novel, Better Dead, in 1887 and after some success with fiction that dramatised the lives of rural populations in western Scotland, began writing plays in the 1890s...Following a successful career, Barrie was bestowed with a baronet and an Order of Merit and served as Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh from 1930 until his death in 1937. The popularity of his novels and plays never ceases to endure. Barrie’s Peter Pan and Other Plays remains on the reading list for undergraduate students studying Scottish literature and, in 2014, Dr Jonny Murray, a Senior Lecturer at Edinburgh College of Art, published a paper entitled The Boy Who Never Grew Up? J. M. Barrie and Cinema." 
Price: 30.00 USD
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The Glory Of The Imperfect, Palmer, George Herbert
2 Palmer, George Herbert The Glory Of The Imperfect
New York Thomas Y. Crowell & Company 1898 1st Edition; 1st Printing Hardcover Very Good+ 
This book is in Very Good+ condition and is lacking a dust jacket. The book and its contents are ingenerally clean, bright condition. The spine ends and corners of the book covers have some light bumping and rubbing. The text pages are clean and bright. There is a previous owner's inked gift notation on the front endpaper, and a Sears Roebuck sticker on the front pastedown page. "George Herbert Palmer (March 9, 1842 – May 7, 1933) was an American scholar and author. He was a graduate, and then professor at Harvard University. He is also known for his published works, like the translation of The Odyssey (1884) and others about education and ethics, such as The New Education (1887) and The Glory of the Imperfect (1898)." "In 1870, Palmer became an instructor of the Greek language. When someone commented that Palmer taught Greek, he said "You are mistaken. I do not teach Greek. I teach boys. Greek is what I start with." Between 1872 and 1876, Palmer curated the 'Gray Engravings' (a collection of engravings bequeathed to Harvard College by Francis Calley Gray) , which he proposed to have photographed and make generally available the prints "to foster the growing taste in the community for the higher forms of Art" (thereby serving as a precursor to Harvard's Open Collection Program) , as well as that Harvard's "students will soon prefer these to the inane works which now decorate too many of their rooms". Simultaneously (from 1872) Palmer also taught Philosophy, being elevated to the rank of Assistant Professor in 1873, and Professor in 1883 - a position he held for six years , when he became an Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity at Harvard (a tenure that lasted from 1889 to 1913)." This volume contains an address Dr. Putnam gave at the first Commencement of the Women's College of Western Reserve University. "Western Reserve College was founded in 1826 in Hudson, Ohio, about 30 miles southeast of Cleveland. The college—the first in northern Ohio—took its name from the surrounding region (known at that time as the Western Reserve of Connecticut) and emphasized standards, such as the classics, in its curriculum. Yet it stood out in the mid- and late-19th century as one of only a few institutions that sought innovation and embraced the sciences. By 1887, the college had begun hiring forward-thinking scientists, including Edward E. Morley, best known for his collaboration with fellow professor Albert Michelson on the Michelson-Morley Experiment, which inspired Albert Einstein's work in relativity." 
Price: 40.00 USD
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